Category Archives: History

Complete set of A Short History of Byzantium audio for sale

There is a very rare opportunity to purchase the hugely enjoyable and authoritative  complete and unabridged audiobook of John Julius Norwich’s “A Short History of Byzantium”, brilliantly narrated by John McDonough. From its beginnings in A.D. 330, this audiobook provides listeners … Continue reading

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Over 60 pristine shipwrecks, many Byzantine, found in Black Sea

What claims to be the biggest ever maritime expedition, led by British Professor Jon Adams of the University of Southampton, set off to investigate climate change in the Black Sea three years ago, but found many ancient shipwrecks as well. … Continue reading

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A very long way from home: early Byzantine finds at the far ends of the world

Through the wonders of the complex web and links of social media I came across this post the other day by Dr Caitlin Green on her personal website. She is a historian and writer whose professional interests lie in the … Continue reading

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Christmas Day diversion – In Our Time Byzantium

If you need some diversion from food family and fatuous television this Christmas, you might like to listen to this BBC Radio 4 In Our Time programme from 2001, where Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the culture, history and legacy … Continue reading

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Ancient textiles from the East in Western churches and museums

Julianna Lees is compiling a list of Eastern textiles pre-1200 in Western churches & cathedrals, and a photographic resource to go with it. She is interested in Silk Road influence, Sassanian fragments, Byzantine, shrouds, etc. On her Flickr site she … Continue reading

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Holidaying in Amalfi and finding Byzantium

When we think of the Amalfi coast most will think of spectacularly beautiful, and fashionable towns clinging to precipitous rock faces, expensive hotels, and maybe even the odd film star walking the streets of Amalfi or Positano. Made popular as … Continue reading

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Was the Ottoman Empire really history’s longest-lasting empire?

It was one of the most resilient empires in world history, but how did it start? And why did it end? This article was first published in the May 2016 issue of History Revealed Was the Ottoman Empire really history’s … Continue reading

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New Book: Greek Fire and its contribution to Byzantine might

We have all heard of Greek Fire. We know of the contribution that it made to certain naval victories for the Byzantines, wreaking terrible destruction on those on the receiving end. Little however is known about the weapon. How was … Continue reading

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Power couples and princesses in purple: coinage of Byzantine empresses

In the Byzantine empire power was technically vested in the emperor. Nevertheless, a number of empresses played an important part in government and even took control… Most commonly empresses came to power as regents for young sons, implying a fixed … Continue reading

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Shipwrecks found in Istanbul’s Yenikapı shed light on ancient ship production

Thirty-seven shipwrecks discovered underwater during the Marmaray subway construction in Istanbul’s Yenikapı shed light on ship production technology in ancient eras. First published in Hurriyet Daily News. An inventory of the types of wood used in the production of 37 … Continue reading

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Julian The Apostate – Last Pagan Emperor

At the end of June AD 363 in the north of what is now Iraq, a Roman emperor died from a fatal wound after a battle and with him the last hope of paganism in the Roman empire died. By … Continue reading

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Ruins of Forgotten Byzantine Port Yield Some Answers, Yet Mysteries Remain

After a drought revealed the seawall of a Byzantine Empire harbor town near Istanbul, archeologists excavated what was a thriving ancient center. But how does it fit into the city’s 1,600-year history? By Jennifer Pinkowski. First published in Scientific American, … Continue reading

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Event: AD 312 Constantine’s Victory at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge – British Museum, 3 November 2012

This sounds like a cracker! The Roman Society and the Association for Roman Archaeology will mark the anniversary of the Battle of the Milvian Bridge with a series of four lectures exploring the significance and legacy of the battle, the … Continue reading

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In Bulgaria, Roman Grandeur East of Italy

The Balkans define the meeting of East and West, between what we know as the Western Roman Empire and the so-called Byzantine Empire. The fault line of history and different religious orthodoxies, A true melting pot of cultures which has … Continue reading

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On the anniversary of the critical battle of Manzikert

On hearing of the approach of a large Byzantine army, the Tukish ruler raised his siege of Aleppo and marched into Anatolia to fight the advancing forces. by Niki Gamm ISTANBUL from Hürriyet Daily News The Seljuk Turks first entered … Continue reading

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