From Byzantine Constantinople to Ottoman Konstantiniyye: Creation of a Cosmopolitan Capital and Visual Culture under Sultan Mehmed II

An article from Harvard University by Gulru Necipoglu

Introduction: The conquest of Constantinople engendered Mehmed II’s lifelong ambition to revive the ruinous city’s ancient status as the prosperous capital of a world empire.

This essay interprets the sultan’s negotiation of the western and eastern cultural horizons of his rapidly expanding domains through visual cosmopolitanism, a process of “creative translation” and fusion that contributed to the construction of a multifaceted imperial identity.

Mehmed II engaged with diverse artistic traditions in refashioning his public persona and self-image upon the reconstructed stage of his new capital, which continued to be called Kostantiniyye (Costantinopolis), alongside its popular name, Istanbul (from the Greek eis tin polin, meaning “to the city,).

Strategically situated at the juncture of two continents (Asia, Europe) and two seas (Black Sea, Mediterranean), this was the ideal center for an emerging empire that combined Perso-Islamic, Turco-Mongol, and RomanByzantine traditions of universal sovereignty.

You can read the complete essay by downloading the pdf: click here. It is about 5 Mb so give it a chance to download!

Related category:

The Fall of Constantinople 1453

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About proverbs6to10

Interested in Byzantium and Patrick Leigh Fermor
This entry was posted in History, Istanbul, The Fall of Constantinople 1453 and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to From Byzantine Constantinople to Ottoman Konstantiniyye: Creation of a Cosmopolitan Capital and Visual Culture under Sultan Mehmed II

  1. stelianos says:

    quoting: “Istanbul (from the Greek eis tin polin, meaning “to the city,)”

    I’m genuinely curious, not about who has come up with this inaccurate idea in the first place, but why this absurdity has become so widespread of a rumor…

    http://sites.google.com/site/romeandromania/romania/stampoli/english

  2. kamateros says:

    http://sites.google.com/site/romeandromania/hellenism/stampoli/english
    firstly Constantinopolis was shortened in greek into Stampoli. Subsequently, the vulgar name of the imperial capital, “Stampoli”, underwent an altaic transformation during the 16th c, becoming “Istanbul”, as much as the fancy name of the slavic town of Velesbud (Велбъжд), that is “Constantinopol”, had also experienced an altaic transformation during the 14th c, becoming “Kyustendil”, a name used up to now by the Bulgarians (Кюстендил). Cases similar to the “Stampoli” –> “Istanbul” name transformation, are well attested in the Uralic – Altaic Language Group.

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